Who is this class for: The course is primarily aimed at third- or fourth-year undergraduates and beginning graduate students, as well as professionals and distance learners interested in learning how the brain processes information.


Created by:  University of Washington

LevelBeginner
Language
English
How To PassPass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings
4.6 stars
Average User Rating 4.6See what learners said
Syllabus

FAQs
How It Works
Coursework
Coursework

Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

Help from Your Peers
Help from Your Peers

Connect with thousands of other learners and debate ideas, discuss course material, and get help mastering concepts.

Certificates
Certificates

Earn official recognition for your work, and share your success with friends, colleagues, and employers.

Creators
University of Washington
Founded in 1861, the University of Washington is one of the oldest state-supported institutions of higher education on the West Coast and is one of the preeminent research universities in the world.
Ratings and Reviews
Rated 4.6 out of 5 of 217 ratings

Overall - A good introductory course. But the last week, reinforcement learning and neural networks, could have involved programming questions.

With a extremely rich content, this course is a challenge for students, even for those with maths, ML or neuroscience background. The course requires students to master knowledge of these three fields, but it will prove that it DESERVES the efforts.

I greatly enjoyed this course. It has a nice structure, and the progress is quite reasonable assuming you have decent background in linear algebra and calculus derivations. They still offer great supplementary resources for those lacking necessary background knowledge. Overall, I'd recommend it.

Well-paced, great lectures and good supporting material to follow up with the studies. Totally recommend to people that are interested in modeling the brain (be it neurons or synapses or behavior) with theoretical and computational tools (even if you do not master the math/programming)