Для кого этот курс: This course is based on advanced undergraduate and masters level material and is aimed at researchers, students, and practitioners who wish to learn more about game theory and mechanism design. This course is a follow up to our first Game Theory course, and it presumes that the students are comfortable with the material from that course. You must be also comfortable with mathematical thinking and rigorous arguments. Relatively little specific math is required; however the course involves some probability theory (for example, you should know what a conditional probability is) and some calculus.


Автор:   Стэнфордский университет, The University of British Columbia

LevelAdvanced
Language
English
How To PassPass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings
4.8 stars
Average User Rating 4.8See what learners said
Программа курса

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Задания курса
Задания курса

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Авторы
Стэнфордский университет
The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly referred to as Stanford University or Stanford, is an American private research university located in Stanford, California on an 8,180-acre (3,310 ha) campus near Palo Alto, California, United States.
The University of British Columbia
The University of British Columbia is a global centre for research and teaching.
Рейтинги и отзывы
Оценка 4.8 из 5 по 82 отзывам

Outstanding course.

Great experience. Lotof fun. Awaiting the third volume...

Overall, the course was good. Somehow, the concepts were not as clear as the basic game theory course. Definitely more advanced.

Great course. Nice retracing of some notions of the course Game Theory like Pareto Oprimality. Nice idea doing some examples on auctions and voting systems. Nice proofs